Hidden Treasures

We were hoping to find loads of hidden cash in the walls of our 100+ year old house, so far we haven’t found any money but we have found a few other things…

Under the wood paneling in the (new) dining room was the same base molding that was in the living room. That was a nice surprise. We should now have enough to reinstall it around the living room/ dining room area. That is if I ever get it all stripped, sanded and stained.

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Then Dan found a window that had been covered up by the plaster in the living room. We don’t plan on keeping this window since I have visions of built in shelves on this wall.

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Next he found a transom (also known as a window) above the front door. This we do plan on keeping, although the actual window is not in place just the framing. We plan on replacing the front door so hopefully we’ll be able to find a new transom (window) that will compliment the door.

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There was also a mail slot built into the wall. Can’t wait to get the front siding down to see what it looks like on the outside of the house.

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This was Dan’s favorite find, on the back side of the chimney underneath all the plaster was a very old metal HopAlong Cassidy Target Game.

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And last but not least a portion of the original bead board and crown molding on the back entry way.

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Oh we also discovered the the house originally had used knob and tube wiring. My main motivator behind this whole renovation was to have all the electric redone. I will be very happy when it has all been replaced!

Knob and tube wiring was an early standardized method of electrical wiring in buildings, in common use in North America from about 1880 to the 1930s. It consisted of single-insulated copper conductors run within wall or ceiling cavities, passing through joist and stud drill-holes via protective porcelain insulating tubes, and supported along their length on nailed-down porcelain knob insulators.

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